Tuesday, August 21, 2012

What would you do?


Tulsa police warn against breaking into a car to save an overheated dog


Hi, this is Margaret Daley. On one of my loops someone posted about this and since I live in Tulsa, I was interested in what the article was about as well as the people's comments. This was on a radio station's blog in Tulsa (http://www.krmg.com/news/news/local/tulsa-police-warn-against-breaking-car-save-overhe/nPjJ3/). It went on to talk about if a person saw a dog in a hot car in a parking lot if they broke the window to rescue the dog, they could be charged with vandalism. The temperature in Tulsa has been well over 100 for many days this summer--some days setting a new high record. In fact, one day in July we had one of the highest temperatures for a city in the world.

So what would you do if you saw an animal in a locked car in the heat? Call 911 and hope someone comes to rescue the dog. Break the window and possibly face vandalism. Walk away. Or something else.

14 comments:

  1. Call 911. I would only break the window for a baby or a small child.

    First I wouldn't want to be acused of vandalism and also because of what happened to a friend of mine. She broke the glass to save the dog. Problem? The dog still had some strength to protect his owner's propriety and she got hurt.

    Better all along to wait for police or paramedics.

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  2. I'm with Teresa. I'd call 911, but I'd also ask the store or business where the person was parked to make an announcement.

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  3. Actually, this happened not too long ago. A woman had left her dog in the car. My hairdresser called the police and they came and let the dog out. The woman was not happy that police had been called and couldn't seem to understand why they would be there. She had been at the store for over an hour. I would do the same. Call 911 and yes, would break a window for a small child or baby.

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  4. I'd call 911 as well unless the dog looked like it was near death.

    What a distressing situation! Why would anyone ever leave a pet in the car in that heat??

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  5. Have never been in situation like this but guess the ladies are right best to call 911 unless dog seemed to be passed out...
    there have been way too many children left in cars and I cringe each time I read of this happening,just think how hot it is when you come back to car to leave...

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  6. Here in Phoenix, we have that weather every summer. If the dogs were in distress, I'd call 911 and then if possible do what Debbie said.

    Leaving my son in the backseat during the heat was a big fear of mine. About the time he was born, there was about five news stories about babies being left in the backseat. I never did, wouldn't, but boy can the news play with your pysche.

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  7. Hi Fellow Tulsan:

    I’d call 911. The owner might only be away from the car for a few minutes. This is probably true in most cases that people do this. But don’t count on 911. I live in Tulsa and not long ago I saw a police car near my house with the door open and engine running with no policeman around. I then saw a policeman running after a man between houses. One policeman. One bad guy. So I called 911. Busy. Busy. Busy. I never got through to 911. Eventually the policeman came walking back to his car. The bad guy got away. Still no 911. Still no backup for the policeman. I spoke to the cop and he left. A few minutes after that my phone rang. 911 was calling me back to see what was wrong. I told them.

    They say you should also have a police and fire department direct phone number on your cell phone. Now I know why.

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  8. Good point, Vince, about having the actual numbers of the fire department and police on our cells. I never thought of 911 not answering. Silly me!

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  9. Thanks, Vince, for letting me know that. 911 should never be busy. People calling 911 sometimes are frantic and in a panic. They might not think to look up the police or fire number.

    I know what you mean, Pamela. We've had a few stories about children being left in a car and dying. Broke my heart.

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  10. I always wonder why people do the things they do. Some are stupid, some ignorant and some careless. And sometimes even those of us who aren't any of those things, get distracted. With often tragic results.

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  11. This breaks my heart. Why take the dogs anywhere if they can't go inside? I agree with Debbie and would probably talk to the store and call 911.

    Vince, I didn't realize 911 could be busy. I have connected with the wrong area when using a cell phone in a rural area following a car-deer accident. That was very strange, but they gave me the direct number to reach the area police.

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  12. I'd probably start searching for the owner of the car in nearby businesses, stores etc. I'd also call 911.
    Good point about having the direct numbers. I'm going to do that right now.

    Once when I was babysitting a kid, I think he was two. He was in the back in his car seat. I got out, shut my door and went around to get him out and he hit the lock button next to his seat, which locked all the doors. I had left the keys on the passenger seat next to my purse. He couldn't lift the lock back up. Needless to say I about came unglued. It was a hot Sacramento summer day. I called 911 and they sent the fire department. They broke him out. In all he was in the car for ten minutes. But he and I were both sweating by the time the doors opened. I learned my lesson to always have my keys in my hand when I get out of the car.

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  13. Oh, Terri, that would be hard. I can just imagine how frightened you were.

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