Wednesday, March 16, 2016

How Does Your Garden Grow?


Linda Goodnight here. It’s that time of year again. Spring has come to Oklahoma, and I have a yearning to be out in the garden playing in the dirt. Below is a photo I took near our pond, an old "home place" where flowers grow untended. Can anyone tell me what that white bush is?


I normally grow little tiny tomato gardens but this year Mr. G. plowed up a huge garden spot. I hope I can follow through with this grand idea of growing and preserving my own corn, okra,  tomatoes and so on. One thing I know about gardening. It takes work. Even on days when the sun is too hot or my body is too tired, a garden won’t wait. Weeds take over. The plants dry out. The fruit over-ripens and dies. I have to persevere.

Writing a book is a lot like growing a garden. It takes perseverance-from plowing the fertile ground of the imagination to the seed of an idea that, with careful tending, can take root on the page. Once the story seed blooms, I must dig out the pesky weeds of too much back story, overused adverbs and stilted dialogue. Yes, writing a book takes lots of work, but like the garden harvest, the end result is worth all the sweat and effort.(Remind me I said this in August when it’s 100 degrees!)

Are you planting a garden this spring? Have you ever? And please somebody, identify that white bush!


Linda Goodnight’s latest writing “fruit” is The Rain Sparrow, available now anywhere books are sold. 

The Library Journal says: Tender, haunting, and soul-satisfying, this story of hope, redemption, and justice skillfully blends romances in two separate time periods.









5 comments:

Missy Tippens said...

Writing is a lot like a garden! :)

I can't tell what the bush is. Can't see it well enough. Good luck finding out!

pol said...

Linda it looks a bit like Babys breath to me.

Merrillee said...

Linda, I love your analogy of gardening and writing a book. So true.

Christine Johnson said...

It'll be months yet before I can plant my gardens. Usually between Memorial Day and Father's Day. It's too cold before that. I love the analogy and the beautiful photo. Wish I could help you identify the bush, but we don't have anything like that in the spring where we live. Spirea (bridal veil) blooms much later.

CatMom said...

Linda, if the blooms were yellow I'd say forsythia.
I went to a gardener's site and found 3 possibilities: Lantana, Chokeberry, and Mayhaw.
Of course, it's likely none of these, LOL, because I couldn't see it closely enough in the photo. But I was curious too, so if you DO find out please let us know!
Hugs, Patti Jo