Tuesday, March 13, 2012

WHAT WILL YOUR LEGACY BE?

Sandra Orchard here


With the release this month of Shades of Truth, the second novel in my Undercover Cops series, I've been thinking about legacies. That's because the heroine in my book is battling to preserve her father's legacy at any cost.

Legacies can take many forms. It could be an example of a life well lived, of faith that remained steadfast through life's storms. Or as in the case of my novel, the faith-based youth detention center that the heroine's father founded.

My mom's lovingly knitted articles are part of the legacy she left her children and grandchildren.





Being a romantic suspense writer, I fondly refer to this pair as my hero and heroine mascots, and the cavalier fellow below is my dastardly villain.





In my March release, Shades of Truth, the heroine battles to save the youth center her father founded, and discovers villains aren't always what they seem.

Big city detective Ethan Reed is working deep undercover at a Christian youth detention center. The kind of place he spent some harrowing time in as a kid. Ethan's mission: ferret out who's recruiting resident teens for a drug ring. He expects help from the lovely, devoted director of Hope Manor. But Kim Corbett won't tell Ethan anything, even when she's threatened and attacked. When Ethan discovers what Kim is protecting, his guarded heart opens just a bit wider. Enough to make this the most dangerous assignment of his career.

Your Turn: What kind of legacy have your parents or grandparents left you, or are you leaving for your loved ones?

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16 comments:

  1. I love the dolls love the villian best I have to say.
    Im not sure what legacy family have left. I guess I have an great uncle on both mum and dads side who died in WW1 One at Gallipoli which a famous battle for Aussies. and the other died in Austria and won a military Cross for bravery.
    From mum I would say I made her a special 80th birthday album with many people writing memories which is a legacy as it tells memories from different parts of her life.

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  2. Ps my legacy at this stage is the novels I donated to the church library. I have even put in my will that my novels will go to the church library.

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  3. Waoh! That's a nice one Aus. Keep it up.

    My parents showed me by example thta godliness and hardwork is the best legacy. I embrace these and am passing it on already to my own children.

    Beautiful women, good day!

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  4. Great post Sandra. And thought provoking this early in the morning here in Phoenix. I've never thought of my mom's knitting and needlecraft that way before. Thanks. I think the best legacy that has been passed down is our love of reading. My grandparents read, so do my parents, I--of course--love to read, and I've passed that love down to my kids. Hopefully they'll pass it down to theirs someday--even if it is on a Kindle or Nook.

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  5. I'm so enjoying reading all your answers.

    Jenny, a military cross for bravery, wow! I love that you're donating all your novels to the church!

    Olufisayo, amen! The best legacy. :)

    Kim, I love that your passing down that love of reading. My parents did that for me, too. They both always had a book on the go. How about love of writing? Are any of your children inheriting that? :)

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  6. Great post Sandra. As for legacies, my parents passed down the example of their life well lived. Something more tangible is the handmade quilts my mother made for each of her children and grandchildren.
    The legacy I hope I'm leaving to my own children, I hope, is the belief that it is both worthwhile and important to pursue their own dreams

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  7. Love, love, love the dolls. I don't knit, but I crochet. You made me wish for some free time.

    What a thought-provoking topic. I think what my parents passed down that I'm most proud of is church attendance. If the doors we open for service, we were there.

    On the side, I can't drink hot tea without remembering my mom.

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  8. Winnie, the pursuit of our dreams...awesome!

    Pamela, ah tea and mothers. :) I have a funny story about that one. About a week before my mom passed on she asked that I not be allowed to make the tea for her funeral. LOL. I was a young mom, pinching pennies so I guess the brand wasn't up to snuff. :) Now, we buy only Tetley and yes, I think of my mom, too when I drink it!

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  9. Sandra, your mother sure was talented! Those are wonderful! :)

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  10. Since among Latin people legacies in the phisical form usually lead to so many problems among family members, I prefer the emotional legacies left...

    I also treasure little objects that tell the history of my relation with that person; when we share a common history even a shard can tell about so many wonderful and loving memories.

    I was lucky enough to have some items from my antecessors but those I trust are the memories; so when I remember them I don't think of the golden necklace or ring but the laugh, the prayer, even the tear shared.

    Objects do hold memories, but only because (and if) they were made and givem with Love which is the fuel that makes us eternalize the gesture of leaving something. A mark - I lived, I loved, I trust you.

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  11. My dad was military so my deep love of country is from him. My mother was a woman of great faith, and my love of the Lord is from her.

    Wonderful post.

    Your latest LIS sounds like a MUST READ!

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  12. Thanks, Eva.

    Teresa, I really like your perspective. It reminds me of something I treasure, not because of the object--a much worn tiny panda keychain--but the fact that my aunt gave it to me after my grandmother died. I had given it quite proudly as a tike to my grandmother and she had lovingly kept it in her purse (transferring from purse to purse) for over a decade and a half. Now, I have it hanging next to a picture of her as a visible reminder of how she carried me in her heart every day. :)

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  13. Debby, sounds like you have a rich heritage indeed! As for my book, I hope everyone agrees with you. :wink:

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  14. Love the dolls! My grandmother was a sewer and made some beautiful doll clothes for me.
    But the best legacy my grandmother left for me was the heart of a servant. Although I could never have as big of a heart nor sacrifice as much as my grandmother and her siblings, I trust that with God's help I can also have a servant's heart.
    For my legacy, I pray my ministy with children will continue to impact lives. One of the boys I had the privilege of praying with as he asked Jesus to be his Savior is now in full time youth urban ministry.
    Sharon

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  15. Love the dolls! My grandmother was a sewer and made some beautiful doll clothes for me.
    But the best legacy my grandmother left for me was the heart of a servant. Although I could never have as big of a heart nor sacrifice as much as my grandmother and her siblings, I trust that with God's help I can also have a servant's heart.
    For my legacy, I pray my ministy with children will continue to impact lives. One of the boys I had the privilege of praying with as he asked Jesus to be his Savior is now in full time youth urban ministry.
    Sharon

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